Sharing the Lane With Multiple Motorcycles

If you’ve been injured in a motorcycle accident due to the fault of another, then Arizona law may entitle you to damages.  Do bear in mind, however, that the lawsuit may be a bit more complicated than it initially appears. Motorcyclists are often — and unfortunately — perceived by much of the general public to be inherently undisciplined on the road.  This perception can be challenged, of course, but it takes skillful and detail-oriented advocacy, particularly in situations where the injured motorcyclist may have engaged in behavior that is violative of the law. Without context, this can all be somewhat confusing.  Let’s explore some basic issues relating to lane sharing and splitting, and how liability is affected. Two Motorcycles May Ride Together in the Same Lane In Arizona, Section 28-903A of the Revised Statutes quite clearly allows for two motorcycles to ride abreast of one another in a single lane.  This “lane sharing” allowance is limited to two motorcycles, however.  If another motor vehicle attempts to share the lane with you, then they could be held liable in the event of an accident. Prohibited Behavior Arizona prohibits a variety of behavior relating to motorcycle lane use: Motorcycles may not ride more than two abreast in a single lane Motorcycles may not ride between lanes of traffic (i.e., lane-splitting) Motorcycles may not overtake other vehicles in the same lane (they must transition into the next lane and back to perform a passing maneuver) By violating any of these prohibitions, you will […]

Wrongful Death and Financial Support Losses

The unexpected and wrongful death of a loved one can leave their family members devastated in many different ways. Though it’s natural to think only of the emotional consequences at first, there are real financial consequences to the loss of a loved one on whom you and the rest of your family have come to rely for support.  Without the income generated by a spouse, for example, a nuclear family may struggle with paying for food, rent, education, and health expenses, among various other necessities of life. Fortunately, Arizona law may provide certain individuals the opportunity to recover for those losses.  If you’ve recently lost a loved one due to the negligence, recklessness, or wrongful misconduct of another, then Arizona law may entitle you to significant wrongful death compensation. How does it work?  Let’s take a closer look. Wrongful Death Basics Wrongful death actions give certain qualified family members the right to pursue damages for the losses they have directly suffered due to the death of their loved one.  For example, a wrongful death plaintiff may recover damages for the mental anguish they experienced (and continue to experience) as a result of their spouse’s death. For a wrongful death lawsuit to succeed, there must be underlying liability.  In other words, the defendant (who is responsible) must have acted in a negligent, reckless, or intentionally harmful manner, thus causing the death at-issue. Calculating the Loss of Financial Support In many wrongful death cases, financial support losses form the largest component of […]

Unique Issues in Cases Involving Catastrophic Injuries

Contact a Phoenix Serious Injuries Lawyer Today for Help If you’ve suffered catastrophic injuries in a motor vehicle accident (that was caused by the negligent, reckless, or intentional misconduct of another party), then Arizona law may give you a right of action for significant damages as compensation.  Catastrophic injury claims are often associated with high damage recoveries, but — while it’s important to remain positive — there are a number of unique challenges associated with such disputes. Let’s take a look. Damages Must Be Sufficient to Cover Losses Catastrophic injury damages must be sufficient to cover all your losses.  These losses can be extensive and diverse, depending on the nature of the accident, the plaintiff’s own circumstances, and the resulting injuries.  It is not “satisfactory” to secure damages that are not enough to cover one’s losses. For example, suppose that you are injured by a truck in a highway accident.  The truck driver lacks adequate insurance coverage to compensate you for the range of losses that you suffered as a result.  Though your damages totaled $500,000, you were only able to recover $100,000.  That would be insufficient, given the circumstances. Now, if your attorney identified that the truck driver was an employee acting within the course and scope of their employment (at the time of the accident), then you might be able to bring a lawsuit against the employer under the vicarious liability doctrine.  The employer would likely have sufficient insurance coverage to pay out your damages in full. Effective […]

$

What Our Clients Are Saying

"Jack and Michaela were friendly and professional while my case was ongoing. They kept me informed of the status of my case on a regular basis and reached a better settlement than I expected. It was such a relief to know I had someone on my side and fighting for me. Jack also called numerous times just to ask how I was in my recovery and tell me to just concentrate on getting better. I highly recommend Mr. Hirsch."